What is Women Coaches Academy?

Japanese Women Coaches Academy offers coaching education and training based on scientific research to women who aim to become advanced coaches.  Program includes perspectives such as work-life balance, diversity management, etc, which are essential to women coaches who aim for the top level along with their athletes, and differs substantially from the traditional courses available for sports instructors.  Moreover, the program provides the opportunity to building a network that would support career development, and furthermore, beyond the bounds of sports, introduces people from both international and domestic organizations who can become your mentors.  This is the "one and only effort made in Japan" to support women coaches who go out on the international scenes from Japan.

program
Date
September 5-7,
2017
Venue
Karuizawa Prince Hotel
(Nagano Prefecture)


Karuizawa, Karuizawa-machi, Kitasaku-gun, Nagano, 389-0193 Japan
TEL:+81-267-42-1111
FAX:+81-267-42-7139
Website is here
We offered the child care service for women coaches who are in the child-rearing years.
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女性コーチday1
1. Opening (Self Introduction)
2. Professional Coaching
Ms. Marlene Bjornsrud, Former Executive Director, Alliance of Women Coaches
3. Women in Sport
Ms. Kaori Yamaguchi, Associate Professor, Faculty of Sports and health Science, University of Tsukuba
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
4. Conditioning for Female Athletes Ⅰ "Female Athlete Triad"
Ms. Natsue Koikawa, Deputy Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
5. Conditioning for Female Athletes Ⅱ "Sports Nutrition"
Dr. Shihoko Suzuki, Professor, Faculty of Health and Welfare, Nutrition Major (Undergraduate, Master and Doctor), Kanagawa University of Human Services
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6. Career Planning for Coaches
Dr. Nicole LaVoi, Co-Director, Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, University of Minnesota
7. Mental & Coping Skill
Ms. Miyako Tanaka-Oulevey, President, Polygone Inc.
8. CoachDISC Program
Ms. Liz Hanson, Client Director at Athlete Assessments.
Dr. Maki Itoh, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University
9. CoachDISC Practice
Ms. Maki Moriya, President, Laurelgate Co.,Ltd.
10. Diversity in Sport
Dr. Rieko Yamaguchi, Associate Professor, Faculty of Business Administration, Josai University
Ms. Marlene Bjornsrud, Former Executive Director, Alliance of Women Coaches
Ms. Miyuki Kobayashi, General Manager of JEF United Ichihara Chiba Ladies
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11. Leadership
Ms. Lisa O'keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
12. Navigating the Future for Women Coaches
Ms. Lisa O'keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England
Dr. Nicole LaVoi, Co-Director, Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, University of Minnesota
Ms. Liz Hanson, Client Director at Athlete Assessments.
Coordinator : Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
13. Networking
Ms. Miyuki Kobayashi, General Manager of JEF United Ichihara Chiba Ladies
14. Closing Ceremony
Cosponsorship
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Supported by
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Japan Sports Agency
Cooperation
Unicharm Corporation, Curves Japan Co.,Ltd., E3 Enterprise, NIKE Inc., Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd.
MEXT-Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014-2018
01
Opening (Self Introduction)
Facilitators
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
Dr. Maki Itoh, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University
Opening for
the Women Coaches Academy 2017
The Women Coaches Academy 2017, celebrating its third annual academy, started with ice breaker activities. Then, all participants including lecturers and staff who were going to spend the three days together introduced themselves. Dr.Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director of the Japanese Centre for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS) who was hosting the academy, greeted everyone enthusiastically. All the participants were motivated to achieve their goals by learning the history of Women Coaches Academy.
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02
Professional Coaching


Lecturer
Ms. Marlene Bjornsrud, Former Executive Director, Alliance of Women Coaches
Translator
Dr. Maki Itoh, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University
Female Coaches:
Strong Influence on Girls as Role Models
Ms. Bjornsrud explained the responsibility for coaches. Coaches should coach the athletes not only the skills, but also they should play an important role to maximally draw out the athletes’ potential in life. Therefore, Ms. Bjornsrud mentioned the necessity of management skills, leaderships, and qualifications required by coaches. In addition, all the participants had a great time to think about the pros of becoming female coaches, and the reasons why the number of professional female coaches are less in real. Ms. Bjornsrud closed the session by introducing an activity called “Coaching Tree”. It was an opportunity for each participant to show their appreciation to people who influenced them to be a coach. In addition, Ms. Bjornsrud encouraged the participants to become a good role model for the next generation who wish to become female coaches.
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Women in Sport


Lecturer
Ms. Kaori Yamaguchi, Associate Professor, Faculty of Sports and health Science, University of Tsukuba
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
Learn from the History of Women in Sport
Have the Courage to Make it Happen!
Dr. Ogasawara provided the history of women in sport, including movements and improvements that had been done in the past both in Japan and in the world. For example, on April 10, 2017, major sports organizations in Japan including the Japan Sports Agency signed the “Brighton Plus Helsinki 2014 Declaration”, and various movements also occurred in Japan. Still, there are only a small number of female leaders (board members, coaches, etc.) and the issues arising from this were clearly explained based on various cases and data. From now on, attention is focused on how women in sport in Japan and female leaders in sport will move forward. Throughout the session, powerful messages were conveyed to the participants by two female leaders representing Japan (Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, and Professor Kaori Yamaguchi) with easy, understandable examples.
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04
Conditioning for Female Athletes Ⅰ "Female Athlete Triad"
Lecturer
Ms. Natsue Koikawa, Deputy Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
Prevent and Support Female Athletes from
the “Female Athlete Triad”
What should Coaches know in advance?
The “Female Athlete Triad (FAT)”, known as the three liable triads seen in female athletes, and the most recent information on treatments and prevention concerning FAT were lectured based on research facts by Ms. Koikawa. She also highlighted the importance of coaches to acquire correct knowledge of conditions and physical characteristics of female athletes.
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05
Conditioning for Female Athletes Ⅱ "Sports Nutrition"
Lecture
Dr. Shihoko Suzuki, Professor, Faculty of Health and Welfare, Nutrition Major (Undergraduate, Master and Doctor), Kanagawa University of Human Services
Understand Sport Nutrition and
Support Female Athletes to Lead
an Optimal Athletic Life
Dr. Suzuki explained that female athletes’ body sometime become “energy efficient” or even “beyond energy efficient” metabolically that called for attention in sport nutrition based on data and case study. Also, she talked about the importance of supporting female athletes by providing good nutrition to maintain their optimal athletes’ life. Her lecture was easy to follow, appealing, and engaging for the audience. Finally, Dr. Suzuki emphasized the need of sport nutrition management for female athletes to protect their health and maximize their performance.
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06
Career Planning for Coaches


Lecturer
Dr. Nicole LaVoi, Co-Director, Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, University of Minnesota
Translator
Dr. Maki Itoh, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University
Develop a Strategic Plan for
Career Success in Female Coaches
In pursuing career as coaches, an ecological model was presented and the challenges faced by women were explained at each of the four levels in the model. It was explained that it is important to understand the structure by interpreting that female coaches face problems regardless of individual abilities, experiences, and responsibilities. Also, compared with male coaches, the "double standard" faced by female coaches were mentioned, and contents which female coaches are not equal to male coaches were introduced in coaching, employment, and treatment. Finally, the double standard in Japanese female coaches was discussed, and participants were conveyed the strategy to lead female coaches to success.
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07
Mental & Coping Skill
Lecturer
Ms. Miyako Tanaka-Oulevey, President, Polygone Inc.
Enhance “Self-Recognition” as Coaches and
Derive “Coaching Philosophy”
Understand Own Emotion and Mind
by Knowing Stress Patterns
A theoretical explanation about the mental training that is necessary to train the "mind"; one of the important components of the mind, technique, and physical condition for athletes was given to participants. The lecture was developed by a practical form to build participants’ own philosophy as coaches and to understand the factors that impede the athletes' ability to demonstrate their abilities. Participants learned the necessity of self-cognition ability to know "Who Am I?” and visualized how they perceive themselves in the past. Furthermore, explanation was given about the reason why emotional control is important and activity to organize the self-characteristics seen from the stress pattern was also done. All participants learned important things in order to face the athletes as coaches.
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08
CoachDISC Program


Lecturer
Ms. Liz Hanson, Client Director at Athlete Assessments.
Dr. Maki Itoh, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University
Understand both the Own Natural Style
and Adapted Style
Also Understand the Style of Athletes
Participants who carried out the Japanese version of "CoachDISC Profile" deepened their understanding of their own original style and adapted style based on the results of action diagnosis obtained from them. Just like there are action styles in coaches, athletes have similar behavior styles as well. Therefore, the importance of recognizing their characteristics and to understand them were explained. Participants were taught that it is important to understand and determine the situation, assess, select the appropriate action, adapt your behavioral style in order to achieve a desirable result, and to evaluate the result for future reference. The lecture involved group activities and ended up being a serious lecture with laughter heard from the participants now and then.
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09
CoachDISC Practice
Lecturer
Ms. Maki Moriya, President, Laurelgate Co.,Ltd.
Case Study and Self Discovery!
Using the lessons learned in the previous section "CoachDISC Profile program", exercises were held assuming various situations of teams with diverse members. Participants became coaches and demonstrated how they should contact each of the action type players by actually performing their role. It was carried out while receiving accurate advice from Ms. Liz Hanson, and it became a meaningful exercise for the participants.
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10
Diversity in Sport
Lecturer
Dr. Rieko Yamaguchi, Associate Professor, Faculty of Business Administration, Josai University
Ms. Marlene Bjornsrud, Former Executive Director, Alliance of Women Coaches
Ms. Miyuki Kobayashi, General Manager of JEF United Ichihara Chiba Ladies
Understand and Diversity Recognition
In the sports world where performance is considered to be the top priority, issues such as sexual harassment, physical punishment, and sexual minorities had been ignored until now. In the first half of this section, participants understood the mechanism of these issues by learning from case studies in Japan. Then, they considered what they should do as coaches when athletes need advice on the issue such as sexual harassment. In the latter half of this session, participants learned the importance of diversity management, which is to ensure that everyone includes girls, women, and sexual minorities to participate in sport. Finally, participants experienced a workshop called “Coming out Star” where they were given the opportunity to do self-reflection and explore their relationship with others. 
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Leadership
Lecturer
Ms. Lisa O'keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)
Leadership Theory and Practice
The Courage to Move Forward
All participants learned the academic theory of leadership carefully and comprehended logically what they had perceived by the senses in the past. After that, Ms. Lisa O’keefe introduced "This Girl Can" campaign conducted by Sports England and explained based on data how this strategically developed campaign invoked a lot of women's empathy, spread throughout the world quickly through SNS, and made worldwide success. The process of the campaign was also shared which explained how Ms. Lisa O’keefe thought and acted as an insight director (leader). Finally, Ms. Lisa O’keefe, who is advancing and conducting this project, mentioned the future of the campaign. She generously taught the tips and preparation of being a leader and the technique to motivate people, and the participants were encouraged to move forwards.
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Navigating the Future for Women Coaches
Lecturer
Ms. Lisa O'keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England
Dr. Nicole LaVoi, Co-Director, Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, University of Minnesota
Ms. Liz Hanson, Client Director at Athlete Assessments.
Dr. Etsuko Ogasawara, Executive Director, Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS)


Messages from Female Leaders in the World
Discussion developed while the lecturers received questions from participants on the theme of “female coaches advancing towards the future”. When panelists told participants' messages from the global perspective, including their involvement with sports, coaching experiences, and work experiences, a number of participants asked questions and active discussions were deployed. Many heartfelt messages were awarded from the leaders in the world to the Japanese leaders.

Translator, Ms. Miyuki Kobayashi, General Manager of JEF UNITED Ichihara, Chiba Ladies
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Networking
Lecturer
Ms. Miyuki Kobayashi, General Manager of JEF UNITED Ichihara, Chiba Ladies
I Can Do It!
Facilitator Ms. Kobayashi explained the background of how the “Karuizawa Declaration” was created during the “Women Coaches Academy 2015”. The rest of the time was used for the participants to consider what they should do for improvement. Then, all participants expressed their determination with the passion of “I Can Do It!” and promised to keep exchanging information and working together. They obtained strong bond and bravery through the academy, and the “Women Coaches Academy 2017” was completed.
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Closing Ceremony
Precious Time with the Class of 2017
Encouraging Finale for the Future
In the beginning of closing ceremony, peer coaches elected the best coach of the academy. The best coach award was given to Ms. Mikiko Hagiwara. 

Next, a heartfelt and touching message was given from four foreign lecturers. Then, the certificate for completion was given to each participant.

Finally, Dr. Ogasawara (JCRWS) who hosted the academy sent the strong messages to the female coaches who expected to play major roles in the field of sports in Japan. The participants, lecturers, and staff members promised to keep exchanging information and working together. The “Women Coaches Academy 2017” was completed on a high note.
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The class of 2017. They were all hungry to acquire new knowledge and obtained strong bond and bravery through the academy.
Prior to opening the academy, participants visited “Karuizawa Olympic Memorial Hall” and learned the history of Karuizawa, the only city in the world to host both the Summer (1964) and Winter (1998) Olympics.
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Registration at the hotel.
The academy was about to start.
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Conference room and cottages for the “Women Coaches Academy 2017”.
The academy was held in a great learning environment for three days.
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Childcare was provided during the academy for mother participants
and staff members in order to focus on their own activity.
Children had a fun time in the wonderful nature of Karuizawa.
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Ms. H.I. (Athletic trainer, Paralympics)

I did not like words such as “female coaches” or “female athletes” when I was a child. Since then I became a trainer, although I still had negative images for “female trainers”. Therefore, I worked very hard and acted like men so that I will not get any complaints from others just because I am a female. For example, I faced the following situations because I am a female; 1. Not allowed to pursue a certain task 2. Had to tolerate something 3. Tried not to cause people trouble. However, I realized that there are so many things that “I can do because I am a female” and “I can understand because I am a female” after attending the “Women Coaches Academy 2017”. In addition, I was made aware that I am not only a female trainer for my athletes and for myself, but I have a role that I have to pursue as a female trainer. I really would like to thank Dr. Ogasawara, staff members, lecturers, and all other participants for their support. Of course, I am grateful to my coach who introduced me to this academy. We Can Do It!!

Ms. H.U. (Softball)

I feel rejoiced and I appreciate that I could attend the "special lectures" by the professional lecturers. It was also grateful to meet and connect with the "team" who are expected to create new achievements from now on in the Japanese sports world and in women’s participation from various standpoints. I felt anxious about making decisions of my own life and tended to put the brakes on difficult career. Through the "Women Coaches Academy 2017", I was able to grasp the "direction that I should aim" and the "power to exert myself toward the future". As the lecturers mentioned, I think I may feel the "loneliness" and "anxiety" when I continue to make new challenges in my life. However, I believe that I can contribute to brighten women in sport in Japan by sharing the pain with my team (including seniors and lecturers) whom I was able to connect at the "Women Coaches Academy".

Ms. M.O. (Track and Field, Paralympics)

The "Women Coaches Academy" that I wanted to participate since last year was a brand new type of program in Japan. What do I mean by brand new? The answer to the question is that they have the greatest lecturers. I was made to deeply think that I should always face myself through self-analysis and practice in order to know what must be done. Until now, there was somewhere in myself that kept telling myself that there is a limit because I am a woman. Balancing work and family, conflict with parenting, daily affliction with lack of power as a coach… I was actually thinking about the timing of retirement. However, I met lecturers and members sharing the same situation at this academy and learned these important thoughts: "I can change all the negative aspects to power", "Solutions to trouble are all in common", "If I cannot do it by myself, make peers and find trustworthy people", and "Women are weak but also strong". Unfortunately, Olympic is well known but people’s interests in Paralympic still face challenges. I believe that Japan will surely change as long as my peers and friends who have understanding towards disability can work together in Japan. "You Can Do It! I Can Do It!"

Ms. K.K. (Handball)

I was able to feel "the preciousness of coaching while being both a mother and a coach". I was deeply touched when I was taught about the concept of female coaches that I have never learned in my life. Lecturers had a lot of experience and knowledge, and I was able to learn the advanced level of coaching. Especially, I am thankful for being able to understand myself objectively from the "CoachDISC Profile", as it appears that it brought a big change to my current coaching. The most fortunate thing for me that I gained through the academy was being able to connect and create a strong bond with members that I can relate each other on many things, lecturers and staff who are active in the sports field in Japan and overseas. My goal is to become a top coach while being a mother at the same time. It may not be easy, but I would like to accomplish my mission in a wide perspective along with the members who declared the Karuizawa declaration. I am very thankful to you all.

Ms. M.H. (Basketball)

“Women Coaches Academy 2017” was a game changer for me because I had been wondering like “Am I doing the right thing?” or “I should learn more” about my coaching. Lecturers came from both Japan and abroad and were experts in their fields. All lessons were very useful, practicable, and full of passion, so I was far from sleepy. Particularly, I was totally convinced by the concept of “CoachDISC Profile” and it inspired me to immediately practice the good work into my workplace. This two nights and three days experience was an excellent opportunity full of laughter and tears.  I am glad that I was able to participate in this academy.
Contact Us
Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport(JCRWS)
Tel:+81-3-5844-6537    
Fax:+81-3-5844-6538
E-mail:female-sport@juntendo.ac.jp